Early English Antique Furniture Pegged Construction

Up to the early 18th century, most early English antique furniture was  ‘joined ‘or ‘pegged’ in their construction, using mortise and tenon joints held together by wooden dowels or pegs, or occasionally clout nails. Early wooden pegs were of irregular or square ended in a tapering form; they acted like wedges and tightened the joints as they were hammered in. Over time, shrinkage can happen to the wood and the pegs can be pushed proud of the surface (this is also a good indication that the piece has not been altered at a later date). Later furniture with Pegs in the 19th century are often machine cut and perfectly round and are either flush with the surface orrecessed.

From the early 18th century , pegged construction was mostly stopped in Britain, some other countries still did this type of construction after this date and is mainly associated with continental craftsmanship. The best examples of pegged furniture is in an early antique coffer. Below is an example of an early coffer with old pegged dowel on the top right corner. If you are interested in antiques and period furniture please visit our main website, antiques world.

Rare Antique 17th Century Six Plank Oak Coffer.Rare Antique 17th Century Six Plank Oak Coffer. Rare Antique 17th Century Six Plank Oak Coffer. Rare Antique 17th Century Six Plank Oak Coffer. Rare Antique 17th Century Six Plank Oak Coffer.